PRESS RELEASE

BIG TIMES. INCEPTION

NIMSES IS A WORLDWIDE SYSTEM MADE OF ALL THE TIME EVER LIVED BY HUMAN BEINGS

The future has arrived with all its cryptocurrencies, blockchains, and the merging of real and virtual worlds. Unlike the plots of Black Mirror or In Time, you shouldn’t be worried about Nimses. On the contrary, it seems like we have grounds to find a new hope and build up a bright faith in tomorrow’s future.

BIG FEAR

We’re so used to dead values, perished roots, and fragmented memories. Since a human brain’s ability to build plans rests upon the ability to generate memories, it means no future. Of course, we’ve been warned about this; several doomsdays have already been predicted. Nietzsche certified the death of God, Fukuyama proclaimed the death of history, Spengler declared the same for history’s superorganisms, and Camus pronounced the absurdity of everything. The recent events of Brexit, Trump’s ascension to political power, and the financial turmoil in Spain are just a few illustrations of our world gone mad. And it drags us down with it faster and faster every day.

Hopelessness and madness mark the times we live in now. Having seen everything, nothing surprises us anymore. The more extravagant, poisonous, and intrusive things are, the more accustomed we feel to them. And it isn’t comfort that we search for in these circumstances, who really needs it? We seek meaning. We want to learn to desire again. Yet the aforementioned crises are occurring in a world with enough weaponry to destroy itself.

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BIG BATTLE

The manifestation of the atomic bomb has forced us to examine what’s next. And it turns out that the abstract problems entertaining Plato and Aristotle have become so crucial that they define whether the end will come. In other words, the generation which we call millennials and who we study, trying to predict their behavioral patterns, will have to respond to the existential conundrum of whether to be or not to be, while taking into account all the lessons of the past and the lack of future in the present. And this, in fact, is a great battle between meaning and nonsense.

As for this war millennials will have to enter in the future, their parents could never imagine. They already live in a real, virtual world; they can get almost anything by double clicking a touchpad, and they try to develop a sense of consciousness while staring out a stained-glass window with a technological mind. But at the same time, they often do not have the most important thing—true sense. The very same sense described by Frankl. They must live with the idea that nothing around them matters. They place a like, easily and without thinking, everywhere—a like for somebody and everybody. And that like pleases someone. From the perspective of brain chemistry, it releases dopamine. That is to say, the human nervous system responds to the virtual abstractions, such as likes and shares on social networks, by releasing hormones of happiness. Indeed, it hurts for a 14-year-old girl not to get likes on her newest selfie.

THEY ALREADY LIVE IN A REAL, VIRTUAL WORLD, THEY CAN GET ALMOST ANYTHING BY DOUBLE CLICKING A TOUCHPAD, AND THEY TRY TO DEVELOP A SENSE OF CONSCIOUSNESS WHILE STARING OUT A STAINED-GLASS WINDOW WITH A TECHNOLOGICAL MIND. BUT AT THE SAME TIME, THEY OFTEN DO NOT HAVE THE MOST IMPORTANT THING—TRUE SENSE.

When and how did virtual reality become so real? Being just a symbol under a post on the Internet, this very like turns into the only possible way to convey sympathy, friendship, and even love. Can likes cope with such a burden? Partially so, but there are nuances. After all, the lifespan of likes is short. A like only lives as one scrolls through posts, showing others that a post got a like. But as soon as the old like sinks beneath the bottom of the screen, underneath the onslaught of fresh content, you need a new like. Here it is, the Sisyphean work of today, and many simply give up on it all together.


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BIG BLUE WHALES

Giving up has consequences. For example, there are about 350 million people of different age groups suffering from depression in the world today. Everyone knows where this disorder leads. Suicide is the second most prevalent cause of death among people aged 15-29, taking away 800,000 people a year [1]. Currently, despite some similarities between adolescent depression and depression in adulthood, there is no consensus on the use of antidepressants in the treatment of minors (Thapar, A., Collishaw, S., Pine, D. S., & Thapar, A. K. (2012). Depression in adolescence. Lancet, 379(9820), 1056–1067.)[2]. Essentially, we’re facing an epidemic of youth depression while not knowing what to do about it.

This is a very small bit of data on millennials. But even these figures suffice to show that we are lost. Our time is simply running out, as it has always been since the beginning of time. However, now the feeling that our time is up causes more expressed anxiety and/or apathy, not the most socially constructive states of mind to say the least. We’re afraid of losing time yet lose it trying to read another book on time management. Being incredibly bored, we spend 9 hours a day on social media. And even living this roller coaster of haste and boredom, we still struggle to find the ultimate sense.

As historical creatures, we are doomed to be trapped in time. We have a complicated and intricate past; we have to cope with the high-tech and homeless present; we are deeply concerned by an uncertain and blurry future. And yet we have the tools to do away with the planet—literally, completely, and for good. Could depression be our way of adapting?

“...DEPRESSION HAS A SECRET PURPOSE AND OUR MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS ARE MAKING A BAD SITUATION EVEN WORSE. LIKE A FEVER THAT HELPS THE IMMUNE SYSTEM FIGHT OFF INFECTION—INCREASED BODY TEMPERATURE SENDS WHITE BLOOD CELLS INTO OVERDRIVE—DEPRESSION MIGHT BE AN UNPLEASANT YET ADAPTIVE RESPONSE TO AFFLICTION. MAYBE DARWIN WAS RIGHT. WE SUFFER—WE SUFFER TERRIBLY—BUT WE DON’T SUFFER IN VAIN.”

LEHRER, J. (2010, FEBRUARY 28). DEPRESSION’S UPSIDE. THE NEW YORK TIMES, PP. MM38. [3]

How do you keep your chin up until it becomes clear what all this suffering is for? Technically, the human body is designed for 120 years of life. But how do you make yourself live that long? We don’t often have human attachments, but numerous screens instead. And this, they say, is addiction. The fact that there are many screens and the number is only getting larger, the screens that are always shouting at us—each in their own language—cause us to start losing our nerves. After all, our brain didn’t learn how to communicate with screens during its evolution, so it continues to demand interaction with living people. And who can be considered as such? Where does communication with the screen end and communication with a living person begin? If our ability to communicate is so comprehensive, why is communication itself so pointless and meaningless?


BIG NIMBS

Our trouble comes from the fact that we simply have no time. Yes, it begins and ends, it is omnipresent, and we even measure it, yet it is invisible. Our body doesn’t contain a special mechanism that would be responsible for counting minutes. Nevertheless, we bear its burden; sooner or later, it always catches up to us. But who would we be without it? Without time, there’s no way we can put together a single comprehensible sentence. We just struggle learning irregular verbs and mastering sequences of tenses.

Now imagine a circle made of time, and yet it’s not a clock face. It’s all the time that a particular person lived from the moment they registered on Nimses—a very real Nim or the personal Nimb balance. It can now collect all the minutes of a person's life, thus stopping the global countdown. Nimses shapes time into a visible form. This means that phrases such as "Sorry, I don’t have time" will no longer work anymore. Given all the problems we face, we, as humanity, despite all our cynicism and desperation, seem to have found a way out of this predicament. Like most of the solutions these days, our approach is also presented in the form of a mobile application, which shows that every one of us always has some time.

NIMSES SHAPES TIME INTO THE VISIBLE FORM.

80 years of human life contain 42,048,000 minutes. This is just a simple fact which doesn’t explain much. It can’t introduce us to the inner world of a person, neither can it tell us how that person looked at the age of 12, 20, or 50. But these are the very same minutes that a person spends on others, on obtaining a profession, on sleeping and cooking, waiting in lines or doing a prison sentence. In this sense, time is money, and Nimses is a tool that opens the possibility to spend and accumulate it. All that users need to do is simply live their lives, minute by minute, an inevitable thing by the way. While these minutes are passing, you can and even should sleep and eat. Don't worry because Nimses will save the minutes into your account in the form of Nims. All you need to do, except installing the application and registering, is to be alive.

TIME IS MONEY, AND NIMSES IS A TOOL THAT OPENS THE POSSIBILITY TO SPEND AND ACCUMULATE IT. ALL THAT USERS NEED TO DO IS SIMPLY LIVE THEIR LIVES, MINUTE BY MINUTE, AN INEVITABLE THING BY THE WAY.

Basically, with Nimses, you can see a numerical, algorithmically-calculated representation of your own soul, a kind of digital aura simple enough to be understood by anyone. It does not need to be explained, because it's time—the greatest unifier. As it turns out, only time is capable of being a unique unifying element accessible to absolutely every human on Earth: languages, ideas and religions have all failed.

Finally, there is something we can truly rely on. It seems like the start of a whole new era of the unconditional value of human life. Nimses is not another social network; it’s an entire ecosystem that hinges on a constant value that is safe from the winds of change and shifting paradigms. Most of the notifications on Nimses are the news of someone sharing irreplaceable minutes of their life with others. Simple as that.


BIG IDEA

Nimses is anti-ideological in the sense that it does not dictate a universal understanding of good. Instead of the 10 Commandments, Nimses offers a circle which resembles a clock. This circle serves as a set of reference points which help one find out what is missing in their life. Perhaps we might even stop caring about what time it is now, and instead start shaping our time and caring for time itself. In the end, sooner or later, we’ll all die, and this equals everybody out. But everyone’s life is different: we are born in different bodies, in different places and under different circumstances. This is exactly what makes us all unique.

IN THE END, SOONER OR LATER, WE’LL ALL DIE, AND THIS EQUALS EVERYBODY OUT. BUT EVERYONE’S LIFE IS DIFFERENT: WE ARE BORN IN DIFFERENT BODIES, IN DIFFERENT PLACES AND UNDER DIFFERENT CIRCUMSTANCES. THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT MAKES US ALL UNIQUE.


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NOT THAT BIG OF A SUMMARY

The idea of having no roots exhausted itself as well as resulted in pretty big fears and no smaller tears. Having big data made us feel small—too small to be meaningful. However, we are not lost yet. It truly seems that Nimses might offer a real cure for humanity. Indeed, who would refuse saving time, the concept that turned from a metaphor into a high-tech solution, built on complex algorithms. Perhaps we have something more solid than time. As paradoxical as it may seem, this something is made from time, too.


ABOUT NIMSES AND ITS DEVELOPERS

Nimses is a company that has no borders, no rigorous hierarchy and no nationality. Legally, Nimses is registered in the USA. However, the Nimses team works without any geographical links. Nimses is not international at its core, but rather metanational, with “nationality” being considered an outdated category.

Nimses is a group of special humans who are striving to add some meaning into a world that is already familiar with darkness of nuclear weaponry. Intellectually and physically, Nimses is created in the surroundings of the Chernobyl disaster. Nimses' “creators” do what they do with the sole purpose of interjecting some reason to keep on living in a world full of A-bombs. Irradiated, both mentally and physically, but nevertheless willing to live.

Nimses is a technological solution, not striving to gain its market share; it is not a business in a traditional sense. Technologically, Nimses is a free, location-based application as well as a big hypothesis. Nimses is created to provide something more than money, bitcoins or likes could ever offer. Nimses is the attempt to deal with time in a different, non-linear way than we have all grown accustomed to throughout the evolution of the human species.

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